Whānau Voice

  • Rod and His Sister Gwen

    Posted on

    "As a whanau, we do not want any of our children, our mokos, any of our family, or any family out there going to prison. We want better than that. We see homes, jobs, happiness, whanau." "Being whanau who have survived state care as children, we find that we are often just part of a system that seems to work against us. I did not know who to turn to in order to help my brother get the help he needed after coming out of prison. I have a trusted relationship with Turuki Health Care and they referred me to Te Ira. Dorice is our Kai Raranga and she approached my brother in the right way, to listen to him and what he wants for his future. She understood the role I play as whanau and how we work together to support our children and our mokos to have a better future than we had as children. My brother has been incarcerated most of his life, he won’t talk to many people but he has talked to Dorice and he trusts Te Ira to help guide his new pathway."

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  • Fade's Journey

    Posted on

    “Because of the stand we have taken as a family, the generational curse stops here, my children will not follow the pathway to prison." "I reached out to Te Ira as I had heard they understood the situation of us as a whanau with Dad in prison. I was most concerned about my two eldest girls aged 15 and 13. After my husband went to prison, my eldest girl left her current boarding school and came home. We were in crisis as a whanau. When Turaa came to meet us it was like a whanau member coming to help us. Turaa put us at ease that she was not just another social service going to put us through a standard process. We met at our Kura Kaupapa school and straight away Turaa started working with me as the Mum, the school, the mentor for the girls that we had chosen and began understanding the future we wanted as a whanau. We are now taking action toward that every day.” — Hazel, Fade's mum

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